GRAMMAR TESTS.

Do you vaguely wonder how well you remember a language you half-learned a while back? Try the Proficiency Tests provided by Transparent Language. They’re not very hard (I got 97/150, or 64%, on Latin, a language I was getting rusty at almost 40 years ago), but they don’t take long and are quite enjoyable if you enjoy that sort of thing. (Those of you who still have nightmares featuring multiple-choice exams should probably tiptoe on by.) A tip of the pileus to Des for the link.

Comments

  1. I got a 90% on German but am skeptical — I think it reflects test-taking ability more than actual language skills. If it were a realistic assessment I would have scored about 75% – 80%.

  2. Exactly. I only missed one on Russian, and I know my Russian isn’t that good.

  3. Erik de Jong says:

    Fun tests to take, but I spotted some errors in the Dutch one, which makes me wonder about the other tests. I ended up scoring 100% for English but less for Dutch, which is my native language!
    Erik.

  4. Oh dear. That doesn’t sound good at all. Maybe you should let the Transparent Language people know!

  5. Erik de Jong says:

    That’s a good point :-)
    I just sent them an email to let them know.
    On another note: I noticed the accented characters in the Latin test. I was taught Latin without any accents at all, and I suppose they are there for pronunciation purposes (long vs. short syllables?).
    Language hat, do you happen to know?

  6. Yes, they’re for long syllables, and they’re not very well done. If they’re to be used, it should be only on long vowels, not before consonant clusters. Really, though, you should only use them where they disambiguate (as in the ablative of nouns in -a).

  7. They’re not for long syllables, they’re for long vowels, hence their inconsistent usage before consonant clusters. Most scholarly Latin texts don’t bother with macra (the Romans themselves did perfectly well without them), but texts intended for beginners very often use them throughout, perhaps in the vane hope that the students will remember them when the time comes to scan poetry. As a proficiency test would be more scholastic than scholarly, it seems appropriate to me.

  8. Erik de Jong says:

    Thank you both for the feedback, that was useful!

  9. ı ned some englısh grammar tests

  10. BURAK ÇETİN says:

    I want enlısh language test or examples.I trying englısh language.because; I have got some grammar book and example books.I want to as language test or example if yours.you send to my e-maıl addreses,please.good by

  11. i want to have more informations

  12. *ribbit*
    But seriously, it does seem more of a test of test-taking skills, judging by my performance on German, which I have never studied. I got only one wrong on Russian, and that was because I was in this is easy mode (thus speaks the voice of denial), and I know that I have yet room to improve. On the other hand, I don’t think my French is ten percentage points behind my Russian, and I blame nassssty test-style questions, my precious, which took usss off our guard, yesss.

  13. levent kuru says:

    elamantry

  14. elamentry test

  15. hi…
    give me elementry exercıse…
    thank you.
    bye..

  16. Hi. I want to have a test about the modal verbs. I will be glad if you send me one or more. Do you have any exercises about the modals? C.U. bye

  17. Hi I need some exercises on “prefer,like,would rather,would like” could you please sent me some exercises especially -fiiling in the blanks- thanks a lot

  18. Why are all these pathetic pleas from people with Turkish-sounding names? I can’t decide whether to close off comments to avoid wasting their time and mine or whether to wait and see if the coins keep coming up Turk’s-head.

  19. I have enjoyed reading english grammar .Please would you send to me more paper on it. Jeemy

  20. I want to learn englısh grammer. If you send documents abaut englısh language grammer I will hapy.

  21. İE

Speak Your Mind

*