KUDOS TO THE LOG.

Language Log has been awarded the 2009 Linguistics, Language and the Public Award, given by the Linguistic Society of America “for a body of work that has had a demonstrable impact on the public awareness of language and/or linguistics.”

Language Log will be recognized at the LSA’s business meeting on January 10, 2009, in San Francisco, California. The award will be accepted on behalf of the Language Log team by two of its members: University of Pennsylvania professor of phonetics Mark Y. Liberman (who founded Language Log in 2003 along with Geoffrey K. Pullum, who is now at the University of Edinburgh) and Stanford professor of linguistics Arnold M. Zwicky (who has been a prolific and prominent contributor since shortly after the blog was started).

Congratulations to Mark and the other Loggers for a richly deserved honor!

Comments

  1. A.J.P. Crown says:

    I wonder what the Y stands for?

  2. marie-lucie says:

    It was through Language Log that I discovered Language Hat.

  3. A.J.P. Crown says:

    Yes, me too. Thank you for that, Loggers.

  4. Google informs me that it’s Yoffe, after his mother.

  5. John Emerson says:

    Language Hat is for the more advanced Language Log people, such as Kron and M-Lucie. Especially Kron.

  6. John Emerson says:

    Language Hat is for the more advanced Language Log people, such as Kron and M-Lucie. Especially Kron.

  7. Me three. In regards to both discovering the Hat and pondering the Y.
    I didn’t realise Liberman was of such distinguished stock.
    Many felicitations to the Log.

  8. Congratulations to Language Log. They deserve it.

  9. Crown, A.J.P. says:

    ‘The Log People’ sounds like a PBS documentary.

  10. “‘Log People’ sounds like a PBS documentary.” Indeed, one about people with the ability to digest cellulose.

  11. Many congratulations to them.
    I think I discovered LL through LH. I don’t really remember, though, I may have come at it from several directions at once. (I’m pretty sure I found LH in the course of googling for Nahuatl poetry. Not sure how, though, as Hat doesn’t seem to have ever written on the subject.)

  12. Tlāuhquéchōllaztalēhualtò tōnatoc.
    Ayauhcoçamālōtōnamēyòtimani.
    Xiuhcóyólizítzîlica in teōcuitlahuēhuētl.
    Xiuhtlapallàcuilōlāmoxtli manca.
    Nic chālchiuhcozcameca quenmach tòtóma in nocuic.

  13. Crown, A.J.P. says:

    It is gleaming red like the tlauhquechol bird — that’s a long way from the cricket pitch, if I may say so. Extraordinarily wide range of interests you have, and good luck to you.

  14. Oh, I don’t know a think about Nahuatl poetry, I just prayed to the Great God Google and that was vouchsafed me.

  15. A thing, rather. I think.

  16. I could go back and fix it with my hattic powers, but I have a nasty cold and don’t want to strain myself.

  17. John Emerson says:

    The Hatti were Dravidians, you know.

  18. John Emerson says:

    The Hatti were Dravidians, you know.

  19. Still are slightly. Thank goodness for hattic powers.

Speak Your Mind

*