RUSSIAN PROVERB.

I’m reading Yuri (Georges) Annenkov‘s wonderful (and tragic) Dnevnik moikh vstrech [Diary of my meetings], in which he describes in unforgettable detail his acquaintance with Blok, Gorky, and many others, and I’ve just gotten to a section where he visits Gorky in Sorrento in 1924 and the latter says of the “Fascist blackshirts”: Единственное исключение в человеческой породе: этих я не могу “полюбить черненькими” ['The only exception among the human race: these people I can't "love (when they're) black/dark"']. Googling tells me it’s a reference to a Russian saying “Полюбите нас черненькими, а беленькими нас всякий полюбит” ['Love us (when we're) black/dark—anybody can love us white/light'], which is a compact way of expressing a useful sentiment, and I don’t think it has an equivalent in English.
But who said the saying? Various online sources attribute it to Dostoevsky and Gogol, specifically Dead Souls (e.g., Russian Wikiquote), and more specifically the unfinished second part of the novel (e.g., here: «Полюбите нас чёрненькими, а беленькими нас всякий полюбит», — говорит один из героев Гоголя во втором томе поэмы «Мёртвые души»). But I’ve searched the online text, and it ain’t there. I’m coming to the conclusion that it’s one of those sayings that sound like they should be from a famous author, so people attach them to the usual suspects (in English, Mark Twain and Oscar Wilde are popular for this purpose). But I’d love it if someone knows anything concrete. [My commenters came through again: it is indeed from Gogol.]

Comments

  1. I don’t think it’s purely Russian. Here is a chunk from an American text dating back to 1885:
    “Perhaps the reader has heard the story of the mother who said to her little boy, “Now, Johnny, if you are good and obedient, mamma will love you, but if you are naughty I can’t love you;” to which un-motherly speech the child plaintively replied, “Anybody will love me when I am good, can’t you love me when I’m bad?””
    (http://home.att.net/~spiritword/Adams/spirit24.htm)
    Kaa

  2. michael farris says:

    There was a fairly similar idea in the Italian movie Passione d’Amore:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082883/
    Though there the theme was romantic-sexual love and the variable isn’t being good or bad but whether or not love is returned to the person offering it. But overall, a very similar idea.

  3. And here we go:
    ” ОТРЫВОК ИЗ ГЛАВЫ II
    – У тебя, отец, добрейшая душа и редкое сердце, но ты поступаешь так, что иной подумает о тебе совсем другое. Ты будешь принимать человека, о котором сам знаешь, что он дурен, потому что он только краснобай и мастер перед тобой увиваться.
    – Душа моя! ведь мне ж не прогнать его,– сказал генерал.
    – Зачем прогонять, зачем и любить?
    – А вот и нет, ваше превосходительство,– сказал Чичиков Улиньке, с легким наклоном головы набок, с приятной улыбкой.– По христианству именно таких мы должны любить.– И тут же, обратясь к генералу, сказал с улыбкой, уже несколько плутоватой:– Изволили ли, ваше превосходительство, слышать когда-нибудь о том, что такое: “Полюби нас черненькими, а беленькими нас всякий полюбит”?
    – Нет, не слыхал.
    – А это преказусный анекдот,– сказал Чичиков с плутоватой улыбкой.– В имении, ваше превосходительство, у князя Гукзовского, которого, без сомнения, ваше превосходительство, изволите знать…”
    (http://az.lib.ru/g/gogolx_n_w/text_0350.shtml)

  4. You’ll find this Russian quote in Book 2, Chapter 2 of Gogol’s _Dead Souls_. It seems to be in an earlier version of Book 2 as indicated in this text:
    http://az.lib.ru/g/gogolx_n_w/text_0350.shtml
    – У тебя, отец, добрейшая душа и редкое сердце, но ты поступаешь так, что иной подумает о тебе совсем другое. Ты будешь принимать человека, о котором сам знаешь, что он дурен, потому что он только краснобай и мастер перед тобой увиваться.
    – Душа моя! ведь мне ж не прогнать его,– сказал генерал.
    – Зачем прогонять, зачем и любить?
    – А вот и нет, ваше превосходительство,– сказал Чичиков Улиньке, с легким наклоном головы набок, с приятной улыбкой.– По христианству именно таких мы должны любить.– И тут же, обратясь к генералу, сказал с улыбкой, уже несколько плутоватой:– Изволили ли, ваше превосходительство, слышать когда-нибудь о том, что такое: “Полюби нас черненькими, а беленькими нас всякий полюбит”?
    – Нет, не слыхал.
    and the quote comes up 2 more times in this passage, but not at all in the later version of Book 2 as indicated in this text:
    http://az.lib.ru/g/gogolx_n_w/text_0150.shtml
    -Душа моя! ведь мне ж не прогнать его?
    - Зачем прогонять? Но зачем показывать ему такое внимание? зачем и любить?
    Здесь Чичиков почел долгом ввернуть и от себя словцо.
    - Все требуют к себе любви, сударыня,-сказал Чичиков.-Что ж делать? И скотинка любит, чтобы ее погладили: сквозь хлев просунет для этого морду-на, погладь!
    Генерал рассмеялся.
    The quote would appear on p. 294 of the Penguin edition, but they go with the later version. It would be interesting to see how this passage is dealt with in the newer Pevear and Volokhonsky translation:
    http://www.amazon.com/Dead-Souls-Novel-Nikolai-Gogol/dp/0679776443/ref=si3_rdr_bb_product/105-9135992-1117246
    I found this in Gogol on Google by searching for the second part of the quote. Since it seems that in common parlance, only the first part is used, the first part wasn’t very useful for getting to the original source and it also seemed more likely to be attributed to Dostoevsky than Gogol. Of course, as Dostoevsky said, we all come from under Gogol’s overcoat!

  5. The passage also appears in my hard copy of the Russian:
    Гоголь, Н.В. 1987. Избранные сочинения. Москва: Художественная литература, стр. 567.

  6. Excellent! Thanks much, Kaa and csclancy! (And Kaa, the American text is a great find.)

  7. Once again I’m impressed by the amazing repository of knowledge that I’m allowed glimpses of on this blog.
    While English doesn’t have the expression, I think the sentiment comes through well enough in talk of “fair-weather friends”. I have the unpleasant feeling that there’s a Danish word covering the same phenomenon, but my sesquilinguality is being obstructive again. Trying to catch up after four days offline doesn’t help.

Speak Your Mind

*