SALITA BLOG.

Christopher Sundita’s Salita Blog “is dedicated to his thoughts about the language situation and the over 160 languages in the Republic of the Philippines.” His “obligatory introductory post” says:

Salita is a Tagalog word. Its meanings include word, speech, talk/speak and language. I wanted a word that not only reflects the subject of this blog, but also something that is found in a number of Philippine languages. So far, I have found six more; Ilokano (sarita), Kapampangan (salita), Pangasinan (salita), Rinconada Bikol (sarita), Botolan Sambal (halita), and Tina Sambal (salita).

(If I’m reading my Tagalog dictionary aright, it’s pronounced /salitá’/, with stress on the second /a/ and a final glottal stop.) Chris is a man after my own heart; the bio at the end of his essay “Languages or Dialects?” says: “He is fluent in English, Tagalog, French, and Spanish and has a working knowledge of other languages like Japanese, Bikol, Ilocano, Korean, Portuguese, Catalan, Italian, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, Hindi and others.” I wish him luck in his study of linguistics, and I hope he’ll update the blog regularly—there are recent entries on Christmas and New Year greetings in various Phillippine languages and a very interesting entry on noun markers in Waray-Waray and other languages.
I found his blog via a typically meaty post at Sauvage Noble, which uses the discovery of Chris’s blog as a springboard for a discussion of Sanskrit loans in Tagalog, including a transcription of a pop song (!) about such loans.

Comments

  1. Michael Farris says:

    oops, I’d meant to mention this blog to you before a time or two and usually something got in the way. Glad you found it and enjoy it as much as I do.

  2. Well, I could have found it the way Sauvage Noble did, via my own comment section, but somehow I never clicked on Chris’s name and checked out his site.

  3. Thanks for the plug, Language Hat. :-D I’ve posted an entry about something that’s been on my mind lately.
    And I didn’t know you read my blog, Mike. Glad you enjoy it.
    –Chris

  4. Nice entry! By the way, where is the stress in the name Sundita? I hate not knowing how to pronounce things…

  5. On the second syllable.
    The pronunciation of my surname itself depends on what language you’re speaking.
    American English: [s@n'diR@] (I let /R/ represent the tap that Americans usually do)
    Tagalog: [sun'di:ta?]
    Sundita used to be Lundete [lun'dE:tE?] before the US Army misread my great-grandfather’s handwriting in WWI.
    –Chris

  6. Aha! Glad I asked. I love these family-name stories.

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