SOME CELTIC SITES.

Trevor sent me links to three interesting-looking sites, and since I’m frantically boxing books, I’m just going to throw them up here and hope somebody likes one or more of them. Thanks, Trevor!
Metro Gael: “Gearóid Ó Colmáin’s blog consists of articles written for Metro Eireann, The Irish Democrat, and other writings. His interests include current affairs, the arts and languages. … Gearóid speaks Irish, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Russian, Swedish and English and has a rudimentary grasp of Latin, Ancient Greek, Welsh and Japanese.” A man after my own heart. This post is about leprechauns: “It has become the most effete cliché in our vacuous tourist industry. Yet very few people know what it means, where the word comes from.” Yes, some of the posts are in Irish; just scroll down. Unless, of course, you read Irish.
If you do read Irish, you’ll get more than I can out of Acadamh Fódhla, according to this page “a steering group on seanós song, music and lore.”
Finally, Keltalingvaj Novaĵoj has “Novaĵoj pri keltaj lingvoj, bretona, irlanda, kimra, kornvala, manksa, kaj skotgaela, speciale kiel ili esta parlataj kaj instuataj en Kanado kaj Usono.” But don’t worry, the actual posts aren’t in Esperanto!

Comments

  1. Patricia says:

    Thanks for these – they are all very interesting sites (N.B. “seanós” is a typo for “sean-nós”).
    Best of luck with the move.

  2. I realize you’re in haste, but the posting on leprechauns is unmitigated rubbish. The uncontested etymology of leprechaun is < ModIr. leipreachán, luprachán < MIr. luchrupán < OIr. luchorpán < lú- ‘small’ (PIE *legwh) + corp ‘body’ < L corpus, and all this babble about “little stooping Lugh” and “zealous monks” is the merest invention. What’s more, reach < *reikjan has no cognates outside Germanic, and there is no reason to think it has any connection with Reich, rike, rich < *reiks < Celt. ríx.

  3. Woops — thanks for the correction! Take site with salt, I guess.

  4. Hmm, given its date perhaps the leprechaun post was intended to be unmitigated rubbish.

  5. Good point.

  6. If you do read Irish, you’ll get more than I can out of Acadamh Fódhla
    Not particularly much. It is the usual fake-Irish with bad grammar and bad spelling.
    Yes, some of the posts are in Irish; just scroll down. Unless, of course, you read Irish.
    Gearóid Ó Colmáin’s Irish is not particularly good either. To start with, he uses terminology of his own making, like “teasú domhanda” (“global warmthing”) for “global warming” (correctly, “téamh an Domhain” or “téamh domhanda”). That sort of thing was acceptable before the Internet; now that we have the online terminology database http://www.acmhainn.com, there really is no excuse for being that sloppy.

  7. Tsk. Thanks for the informed commentary!

  8. kelly d says:

    A Phanu: Go raibh maith agat as an rabhadh faoin droch-Ghaeilge atá le fáil ar na suíomhanna siúd. Ní bhacfaidh mé leo (bhuel, b’fhéidir go mbacfaidh mé agus samplaí den seafóid a fheiceál chun iad a sheachaint!). [frc]
    A Hata: Please continue to share anything concerning Irish or other Celtic languages. Your post on eDIL (electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language) was very welcome! Slán

  9. That sort of thing was acceptable before the Internet; now that we have the online terminology database http://www.acmhainn.com, there really is no excuse for being that sloppy.
    I might add to this that Matt Hussey, who has published Gasaitéar Eolaíochta and probably other popular science books in Irish as well, used to edit a popular science quarterly called An t-Eolaí back in the nineties, much of whose content is available on Seán Mac Suibhne’s pages, here:
    http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/~smacsuib/eolai/igeol005.txt

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